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Palenque’s Early Explorers

Palace at Palenque

Palace at Palenque

Excerpts from The Visionary Mayan Queen: Yohl Ik’nal of Palenque

Early explorers: Del Rio, Armendariz, Dupaix, Waldeck, Walker-Caddy

 

In the 1780s, a couple of Spanish expeditions came to Palenque and made crude drawings of structures and art.  The King of Spain was interested in the geography and history of his overseas colonies, and dispatched Artillery Captain Antonio del Rio from Guatemala to bring away samples.  Del Rio removed stucco hieroglyphs, parts of figures and small panels that now reside in Madrid’s Museo de America.

Bas relief sketch by Armendariz, 1787

Bas relief sketch by Armendariz, 1787

Numerous drawings by artist Ignacio Armendariz from this expedition were the first reasonably accurate reproductions of Palenque’s huge array of art.

Another Spanish expedition in the early 1800s produced 27 drawings of panels and tablets, floor plans, and sketches of buildings, a bridge and aqueduct.  Guillermo Dupaix, Dragoon Captain stationed in Mexico, and artist Jose Luciano Castaneda took a 50-mile trek from Ciudad Real (now San Cristobal de las Casas) to Palenque that required eight days on a trail winding through mountains that were “scarcely passable by any other animal than a bird.”  Unfortunately, the work of these two Spanish artists got confounded and appeared in a book by Alexander von Humboldt in 1810 labeled as “Mexican reliefs found in Oaxaca,” a city nowhere near

Castaneda drawing of Temple of Inscriptions

Castaneda drawing of Temple of Inscriptions

Palenque.

The flamboyant artist, traveler and antiquarian, self-styled “count” Jean-Frederic Maximilien de Waldeck adapted Armendariz-Castaneda’s art with his own embellishments of musculature and costumes that gave a distinctly Roman look.  Waldeck, like some other early explorers, believed the people who built these cities came from the “old world,” perhaps Rome, India or Egypt.  This art appeared in an 1822 publication of the del Rio report, with many images copied into Lord Kingsborough’s sumptuous volume the Antiquities of Mexico in 1829.  Waldeck resided at Palenque in 1832, building a pole-and-thatch house near the Temple of the Cross and recruiting a local Maya girl as his housekeeper.  The structure called Temple of the Count is named for him.  He made numerous drawings of reliefs and glyphs, some were careful reproductions but many were fanciful with evocative views of buildings and romantic landscapes used later for paintings and lithographs.

Waldeck drawing of Palace Tower

Waldeck drawing of Palace Tower

Waldeck drawing of elephant head on Palace wall

Waldeck drawing of elephant head on Palace wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can forgive Waldeck for many of his absurdities, such as including elephant heads and Hindu designs in renditions of Maya art.  But I cannot forgive him for partially destroying one of Palenque’s loveliest stucco sculptures, the “Beau-relief” that once adorned the Temple of the Jaguar.  It depicts a graceful figure with flowing headdress and geometric-patterned skirt, seated on layered cushions upon a double-headed jaguar throne.  The figure’s arms and legs hold elegant, ballet-like poses.  Waldeck did draw the figure first, as did Armendariz half-a-century earlier.  Why he destroyed it is a mystery.

 

The Beau Relief drawn by Jean-Frederic Waldeck

The Beau Relief drawn by
Jean-Frederic Waldeck

 

These drawings were reproduced in a number of books and magazines, and caught the attention of two men in the United States who really “put Palenque on the map;” John Lloyd Stephens, American popular travel writer and Frederick Catherwood, English architect and illustrator.  Intrigued by the fantastic images and cities depicted, they determined to travel in search of Maya ruins and publish a book with illustrations about these wondrous things.  They went first to Belize to visit Copan (now in Honduras), and then planned visits to Uxmal, Palenque and other sites.

Belize was under British control then, and some international competition got sparked.  Patrick Walker, aide to the superintendent of British Honduras, and Lt. John Caddy of the Royal Artillery heard about Stephens and Catherwood’s plans to visit Palenque.  Irked that the American expedition might reach Palenque before the British, Walker and Caddy quickly put together their own expedition.  The Britons planned to reach Palenque first by going due west along the Belize River and across the Peten in Guatemala.  They endured a grueling journey through swamps and jungles, arriving two months ahead of the American team.

Walker and Caddy made some quite accurate drawings of figures, panels and buildings and produced a report that remained unpublished for over 125 years.  Their primary goal seemed to be winning the race

Caddy drawing of interior House A, Palace

Caddy drawing of interior House A, Palace

with the American team, and Walker’s greatest interest was hunting game along the way.  Caddy’s report did make prophetic observations; saying that the massive buildings, elegant bas reliefs, and beautiful ornaments prove that in ancient times the city was inhabited by “a race both populous and civilized.”  He also concluded that many more buildings once stood at the site that extended for several leagues.  One entry remarked on a Spanish manuscript from around 1796, in which the local priest claimed that he “discovered the true origin” of these ancient people because of their “perfect knowledge of the Mythology of the Chaldeans.”

 

 

 

Excerpt taken from The Visionary Mayan Queen: Yohl Ik’nal of Palenque.

These excerpts taken from the Archeological Field Journal of Francesca Nokom Gutierrez, a fictional archeologist in my books, describe the history of archeological exploration at Palenque.  I’ll be doing several posts taken from her journal in the first 3 books in my “Mists of Palenque” series.

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